THE

SPIRIT-FILLED LIFE

We believe the baptism in the Holy Spirit is an experience following salvation that empowers believers for life and service.  We further believe His power and gifts are available to believers today.

 

We believe that the baptism of the Holy Spirit is an endowment of power, subsequent to conversion, given by God to anoint the believer for sanctification and evangelism (Acts 2:1-4, Acts 8:14-17, Acts 19:1-6).  The main purpose in receiving the filling of the Holy Spirt is for power (Acts 1:4-8).  However, this is power for life, obedience, and holiness. We believe that the filling of the Holy Spirit produces fruit (Galatians 5:52-23).  This fruit of the Spirit helps us in our relationship with and service to others.  We also believe that the filling of the Holy Spirit produces gifts.  We believe that these gifts of the Spirit are still active within the Church and will remain active until the second coming of the Lord.  Furthermore, we believe the development of the gifts of the Spirit should be encouraged by leadership for the benefit of the entire community of faith (1 Corinthians 12:1-7).  We do not believe that the baptism of the Holy Spirit is a requirement of salvation (Acts 19:5-6).  However, we do encourage to pray to receive the Holy Spirit.

 

The Holy Spirit is the primary force in creating, inhabiting, and building up the Church (Ephesians 2:21-22).  The Holy Spirit works to bring about unity in the Church and power among the individual members through the manifestation of fruits and gifts.

 

The Fruit of the Spirit

The filling of the Holy Spirit means that we should bear fruit.  Paul lists the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-23) in the context of the freedom we have in Christ.  Freedom that is meant for serving one another in love rather than indulging in sin (Galatians 5:13-18).  The acts of our sinful nature have to do with broken relationships and disunity in the church (Galatians 4:19-21) and these acts are the opposite of the fruit of the Spirit.  This means that the fruit of the Spirit does not refer to subjective characteristics.  Instead, it is referring to specific attitudes and actions (love, patience, kindness) that build relationships and unity in the church.  The extent of the fruit of the Spirit in our lives will be most evident in the way we treat the people around us.

 

The Gifts of the Spirit

The filling of the Holy Spirit means that we will also manifest the gifts of the Spirit, though in varying ways.  The Greek word charisma, or gift is related to the word charis, or grace.  The gifts of the Spirit are concrete expressions of the grace of God to us.  Paul speaks of the gifts synonymously with service/ministries and effects/working (1 Corinthians 12:4-11, 1 Corinthians 12:27-28).  Thus, it seems that a gift of the Spirit does not have to do as much with a personal ability, as with the outworking of a ministry, or an expression of grace.  In other words, the gifts of the Spirit are something we manifest, not something we possess.  We manifest the gifts of the Spirit as we help others, teach, have faith, pray for healing, or offer a word of prophecy.  I Corinthians 12:7 says, “But the manifestation of the Spirit is given to each one for the profit of all”.  It is easy to feel that your presence and participation are irrelevant, but Scripture teaches that each believer has been given a spiritual gift(s) to be used for the common good.  Your presence and ministry in and through the church is therefore vital to our ability to be the living temple of God.